natural awakenings magazine articles of 2018

"Love your Liver: The Chinese Medicine Way" April/2018

Chinese medicine teaches us that the liver is responsible for the smooth flow of qi (vital energy) and blood throughout the body. It serves to store blood and maintain proper blood levels, which helps boost energy levels, nourish body tissues and support gynecological health. These combined liver energetic effects are a major key for the creation of overall health as blockages and deficiencies of qi and blood are traditionally said to be the underlying cause of illness, dysfunction and disease.

Free and balanced flow of liver energy also leads to balanced emotions, especially that of anger. It is thus not unusual to experience increased levels of anger and erratic emotions during the spring season. The liver is also the organ system most easily impacted by excessive amounts of stress. It is thus helpful to manage stress levels and avoid engaging in situations that produce heightened emotional states. Practice of internal forms of exercise such as tai chi, qigong and yoga is also productive as they balance liver energy and help one maintain an overall sense of peace and tranquility throughout the day.

 

"Nerve Healing through Acupuncture" March/2018

The ancient healing art of Acupuncture is traditionally known to provide much needed relief for nerve pain, tingling, burning, numbness as well as other symptoms associated with nerve damage or impingement. The Chinese medicine approach to address these symptoms includes eliminating inflammation and blockage of qi (vital energy). Acpuncture opens flow of energy within the meridian system (energy pathways) which may be at the root of pain and numbness in addition to that caused by the original nerve damage or impingement.

 

"The Value of Acupuncture for Pain" February/2018

Acupuncture is one of the oldest healing traditions in the world. In fact, archaeologists found bronze acupuncture needles, thus suggesting that acupuncture was practiced during the Bronze Age (2-3,000 BCE). Today, this ancient healing art is taking its legitimate place as a valuable therapeutic technique in modern medicine. In the United States alone, over three million individuals receive acupuncture each year. Such acceptance has come a long way since New York Times journalist James Reston reported receiving acupuncture as anesthesia for pain relief after an appendectomy during an inaugural China trip with President Nixon in 1972. This was followed by the World Health Organization releasing a list of 43 diseases that might benefit from acupuncture as a result of a symposium they conducted on acupuncture in Beijing, China during June of 1979. More recent research conducted by the NIH has led to their statement that “acupuncture appears to be a reasonable option for people with chronic pain to consider.”

 

"Acupuncture for a Peaceful Mind and a Restful Night" January/2018

According to the National Sleep Foundation (NSF) 35% of Americans report that their sleep quality is “poor” or “only fair.” Moreover, roughly 60 million Americans are affected by a variety of sleep disorders each year. Research has indicated that acupuncture can increase the content of y-amino butyric acid within the body, which enhances sleep quality. Another study found that acupuncture increased nighttime melatonin production as well as sleep time. Furthermore, there is strong clinical evidence that acupuncture is an effective treatment option for a sleep issue such as insomnia, especially when accompanied by relentless ruminating thoughts.